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Introducing Galaxy Store Developer API


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The Galaxy Store Developer API has launched! Providing programmatic access to key functions of Seller Portal, the Galaxy Store Developer API lets you manage your apps and in-app items or check app performance, without having to use the Seller Portal UI.

The Galaxy Store Developer API contains a set of server-to-server APIs which provides access to different areas of Seller Portal:

  • Content Publish API: View, modify, submit, and change the status of apps registered in Galaxy Store Seller Portal
  • IAP Publish API: View, register, modify, and remove Samsung In-App Purchase (IAP) items
  • GSS (Galaxy Store Statistics) API: View statistics about apps registered in Galaxy Store

Content Publish API

Use the Content Publish API to manage your apps registered in Seller Portal to:

  • View a list of all of your registered apps
  • View information about a single registered app, such as the title, status, description, binary information, and more
  • Modify app information, including images, icons, and binaries
  • Submit an app for review (an app must be reviewed before being offered for sale in Galaxy Store)
  • Change the status of a registered app to FOR_SALE, SUSPENDED, or TERMINATED
  • Upload files required when submitting or updating an app

See Content Publish API for more information.

IAP Publish API

Use the IAP Publish API to manage your in-app items of your registered apps in Seller Portal to:

  • View information about in-app items for all of your registered apps
  • View in-app item information for a single registered app, such as the title, status, description, price, and more
  • Register an in-app item
  • Modify an in-app item
  • Remove an in-app item

See IAP Publish API for more information.

GSS API

Use the GSS API to view statistics about your registered apps in Seller Portal to:

  • View statistics for all of your registered apps, such as new downloads, downloads by devices, sales, and item sales
  • View statistics about a single registered app, such as new downloads, sales, item purchases, average rating, ratings volume, item sales, item buyers, new item buyers, and ARPPU (average revenue per paying user)

See GSS Metric API for more information about viewing statistics.

Get Started

Are you ready to start using the Galaxy Store Developer API? Learn more about its requirements by going to the Seller Portal notice or Galaxy Store Developer API. Each API also includes examples showing usage and expected results.

View the full blog at its source

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