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Get Started with Galaxy Store Developer API


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The Galaxy Store Developer API provides programmatic access to key functions of Seller Portal, such as managing your apps and in-app items or checking app performance. It is made up of a set of server-to-server APIs that access different areas of Seller Portal:

Before you can start using these APIs, you must meet all the requirements for access and authentication. Read on to find out more about these requirements.

Basic requirements

The following are the basic requirements are required to use all of these APIs.

  • Seller Portal account. A Samsung account is required to register for a Seller Portal account. You can sign up for a Samsung account when you register for a Seller Portal account.

  • Commercial seller status, to manage paid apps or in-app purchase items. If you want to manage paid apps or paid in-app items, your Seller Portal account must have commercial seller status.

  • Apps registered in Seller Portal. The Galaxy Store Developer API does not support new app registration. You must first register your apps in Seller Portal before you can manage them using the API.

  • Access token. The access token is used for authentication. A summary of the steps needed to create an access token are included in this blog.

Create an access token

An access token is sent in the authorization header of every API call. It defines the scope (which APIs you can call) and can only be used from a valid service account.

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Complete the following steps to create an access token:

  1. Create a service account. Log in to Seller Portal and go to Assistance > API Service. When you create a service account, you generate a private key (used to create your JSON web token) and service account ID (used in the authorization header of the Content Publish and IAP Publish APIs).
  2. Create a JSON Web Token. Create a JSON Web Token (JWT) by providing a header and registered claims to a site that generates the token or programmatically using a JavaScript JWT library.
  3. Request an access token. Request an access token from the Galaxy Store authentication server.

Click on the linked step to see more detailed information about how to complete each step.

Use the Content Publish API

The Content Publish API is used to view, modify, submit, and change the status of apps registered in Galaxy Store Seller Portal. When you have met the basic requirements and have your service account ID and access token, use the following headers:

curl -X <content-publish-api-request> \
  -H  "content-type: application/json" \
  -H  "Authorization: Bearer <your-access-token>" \
  -H  "service-account-id: <your-service-account-id>"

See Content Publish API for more information about available requests.

Use the IAP Publish API

The IAP Publish API is used to view, register, modify, and remove Samsung In-App Purchase (IAP) items. In addition to meeting the basic requirements, the following is also required:

  • The IAP Publish API must be connected with the content in the In App Purchase tab area of Seller Portal. To create this connection, you must either initially distribute your content using the Content Publish API or the content must be in the For Sale state in Seller Portal. If this connection does not exist, matching product information cannot be retrieved.
  • You must integrate IAP Helper into your app. All binaries registered in your content must support IAP.

When you have met all the requirements, use the following:

curl -X <iap-publish-api-request> \
  -H  "content-type: application/json" \
  -H  "Authorization: Bearer <your-access-token>" \
  -H  "service-account-id: <your-service-account-id>"

See IAP Publish API for more information about available requests and request parameters.

Use the GSS API

The GSS (Galaxy Store Statistics) Metric API is used to get statistics about apps registered in Galaxy Store. In addition to meeting the basic requirements, the following is also required:

  • Four cookie values required for authentication (see Get cookie values for more information)
  • sellerID, obtained by using the GSS User API
  • The statistics to view and other attribute values used to filter the response data (see GSS Metric API for more information)

When you have met all the requirements, use the following:

curl -X POST <gss-api-request> \
  -H "Content-Type: application/json" \
  -H "Authorization: Bearer <your-access-token>" \  
  -H "Cookie:<gss-api-cookie-values>" \
  -d '{"<gss-api-attributes-and-values>"}' 

See GSS User API and GSS Metric API for more information about available requests.

Next steps

After you have met all the requirements, you are ready to start using the Galaxy Store Developer API. See Galaxy Store Developer API for a list of all requests available. Each request also includes examples showing usage and expected results.

View the full blog at its source

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