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[Video] Veterinarian Demonstrates How to Upcycle for the Earth and Your Pets With Samsung’s Eco Packaging


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One of the best ways we as individuals can protect the environment and take care of the Earth is to engage in such sustainable practices as upcycling – which is why Samsung has developed their Eco Packaging to allow users to craft helpful pieces of furniture and other decor with their product packaging once they’ve finished unboxing.

 

One such use of the upcycling-friendly Eco Packaging is to craft pet homes with, a process that is made easy thanks to the packaging’s dot design for simple measurement taking and the user manual available via a quick scan of the QR code inside the packaging.

 

In order to see this process in action, watch veterinarian and animal trainer Sul Chae Hyun construct an eco-friendly new sleeping spot for his beloved rescue dog in the video below.

 

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