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[Interview] Whanki Museum X The Frame Art Store – A Partnership That Brings Us Into the Artistic World of Abstract Master KIM Whanki


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Samsung’s The Frame Art Store not only offers customization to fit any home décor and stunning QLED picture quality, but also transforms the user’s display into a window to the world. In October, the Art Store is introducing its partnership with Whanki Museum and the collection of world-renowned artist Kim Whanki.

 

As a pioneer of Korean abstract painting, Kim Whanki created his unique and characteristic art with refined, formative expression that is based on Korean lyricism. He was recognized for his artworks in centers for modern art that include Paris and New York.

 

Samsung Electronics has been partnering with Whanki Museum since 2018 to introduce a range of Kim Whanki’s artworks to global customers and provide easier access to Korean modern art.

 

Samsung Newsroom reached out to Whanki Museum curator Min-A Sung to talk about how art can serve as a medium for both communication and empathy.

 

 

Fostering Artistic Energy and ‘Art For All’

Whanki_The_Frame_main1.jpg

▲ Exterior view of Whanki Museum

 

Whanki Museum, established in 1992, creates a variety of artistic and cultural content through the research, exhibition and publication of the work of contemporary artists. The museum also provides educational programs and seeks to embody the philosophy of ‘Art for All’ by running a range of programs that expose disadvantaged groups to art and culture. “Whanki Museum will become an open venue for facilitating communication and building empathy based on artistic energy,” says the museum representative. “The partnership with The Frame Art Store provides increased opportunities for us to share our culture and art.”

 

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▲ Inside Whanki Museum

 

 

How Samsung Communicates With Global Consumers Through The Frame Art Store

The museum representative also mentions that the ways people consume art are changing. “Art now influences our day-to-day lives,” they say. “In order to keep up with these shifts, we need to introduce new ways for people to experience art, and try to partner with experts to combine art and IT technology.”

 

Whanki_The_Frame_main3.jpg

Morning Star, 1964

 

The representative adds that they have high hopes for the collaboration between the museum and Samsung. “Vivid color and contrast, which deliver a refined sense of rhythm, are key aspects of Kim’s artistic style,” they say. “The Frame’s QLED 4K display is the perfect medium for his work to be showcased to viewers around the world.”

 

With Quantum Dot technology that allows more than a billion colors to be displayed at 100% color volume, The Frame allows artistic intent to come through vividly on a bright screen with accurate color reproduction.

 

 

Master KIM Whanki’s Artistic Vision Realized on The Frame

Whanki Museum has introduced ten of Kim’s major works to The Frame Art Store since 2018. This has allowed users to enjoy major works such as Deer and Eternity Song, as well as a variety of pieces that were not easily accessible to the public before.

 

Whanki_The_Frame_main4.jpg

12-V-70 #172, 1970

 

In addition to displaying Kim’s artworks, The Frame Art Store also provides background information on the pieces. “The curatorial department has created descriptions for each artwork to provide resources that deliver a range of perspectives and introduce Kim’s artistic vision to more people,” relates the representative. “We hope the detailed explanations provided by Whanki Museum will help users experience the pieces in vivid and stunning quality, just as though they were viewing them in a gallery.”

 

The Frame Art Store offers a comprehensive, ever-expanding collection of artworks to satisfy customers’ needs and match any environment or atmosphere. Its catalog now includes around 1,500 artworks from a range of periods and styles that were sourced from 40 famous museums and galleries and are displayed in exceptional 4K resolution.

 

Whanki_The_Frame_main5.jpg

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      ▲ Clifford King of the Point (2020)
       
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      ▲ Under the Sea (2018)
       
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      ▲ Cactus Brothers (2021)
       
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