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The Freestyle: The Camping Companion Built for the Great Outdoors


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Summer is the perfect time to go camping. While on-the-go, some convenient, outdoor entertainment can take your camping experience to the next level. Whether you want some music, a movie or just a little ambient lighting after the sun goes down, The Freestyle is the perfect companion for your next camping trip.

 

 

Portability in a Sleek and Compact Design

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If you want to explore the great outdoors comfortably and in style, The Freestyle is a must-have item in your bag. With its compact size and lightweight, a mere 830 grams, this portable projector is super convenient to pack.

 

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The Freestyle also allows you to personalize your device with a variety of different color skins to choose from, including Blossom Pink, Forest Green and Coyote Beige. It can also be easily changed to match your aesthetic preference or the rest of your camping set up for a more customized color experience.

 

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When packing The Freestyle, use the device’s carrying case to transport it with ease. The case is IP55-rated, meaning it can protect against water and dust and is ready to be used in the great outdoors. In addition, the case was designed to be just as compact as The Freestyle itself, allowing you to safely take The Freestyle wherever you go.

 

 

Auto Screen for a Quick and Hassle-Free Set Up

After setting up your campsite, fiddling with another piece of equipment is the last thing you want. Luckily, setting up The Freestyle is hassle-free — simply place it on a surface and press the power button.

 

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The Freestyle automatically adjusts the level, focus and keystone as soon as you touch the power button. The portable screen automatically adjusts the screen using the Easy Set Up function, providing a clear, straight picture with an optimized ratio of 16:9.

 

 

From Cooking to Watching a Movie: Enhance Your Camping Experience With The Freestyle

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Want to make a delicious meal on-the-go? Expand your outdoor cooking options with The Freestyle. The Freestyle helps you explore the best ways to make food at your campsite with access to online cooking tutorials and recipe videos, all displayed on a large screen that’s scalable.

 

The Freestyle, supported by Tizen OS, comes with over-the-top (OTT) services and streaming platforms, including Netflix and YouTube allowing users to watch various content as if they are at home. Samsung TV Plus also delivers free shows, movies and live TV without a subscription — all you need is an internet connection and you are good to go.

 

 

Optimized Charging for Convenient Outdoor Entertainment

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The Freestyle is compatible with external batteries that support USB-PD and 50W/20V output or above. This allows users to take The Freestyle anywhere they go — whether they are away from home, on a camping trip or otherwise out and about. It also has a specialized portable battery base fit with The Freestyle. It supports 3.6V charging and comes with a 32,000mAh charging capacity, enabling you to project your favorite content for up to 3 hours without needing a separate charger. The Freestyle also lets you stay connected while in the outdoors, with two USB-C ports that allow you to charge your smartphone while watching content.

 

 

Create Memorable Camping Experiences With Scalable Screens

The Freestyle lets you create unique experiences, setting the mood for any occasion. With The Freestyle’s cradle, the device also freely rotates up to 180 degrees, allowing you to find the perfect position without moving it.

 

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It’s easier than ever to create a scenic window view or a relaxing virtual fireplace to make your camping trip much more cozy, memorable and entertaining.

 

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Bring Coloring Books to Life With The Freestyle and Its Accessories

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The Freestyle isn’t just for the adults in the family — kids can also use the projector to bring coloring books to life while on-the-go. Use The Freestyle to project their favorite characters, animals or even a family photo taken during the trip to create a one-of-a-kind, customizable coloring book.

 

Place The Freestyle on the stand and adjust it to the desired height. The Freestyle can project images from various angles, making it effortless for kids to enjoy.

 

 

Capturing Unforgettable Moments With The Freestyle’s Big Screen Experience

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Bring the camping crew closer together by sharing photos and fond memories. To do this, simply mirror your Android or iOS device to The Freestyle and take a walk down memory lane with family, loved ones and friends alike.

 

 

Create the Perfect Ambience With The Freestyle’s Ambient Mode and 360 Surround Sound

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Not only can The Freestyle project an image on the screen, but the device’s lens cap can also diffuse light to create a softer, more ambient vibe. After a long day of outdoor activities, set up The Freestyle and choose an optimal color to relax and unwind.

 

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Sound is a critical element when creating ambiance. The Freestyle’s premium built-in speakers deliver rich 360-degree sound to provide an immersive audio experience without any external sound devices. Worried about disturbing your neighbors? Connect up to two Bluetooth sound devices and listen to music or watch movies comfortably without disturbing anyone else.

 

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Today, there are so many camping accessories to make the experience not only more convenient but also more fun without any extra effort. With a wide range of features and functions, The Freestyle is the perfect addition to your next camping trip, helping to revamp your camping experience and make it more memorable.

 

 

* Some of the images shown are for illustration purposes only.

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