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New Games of Tizen Store

 

Tizen like Android is also an operating system and a platform for mobile devices. It’s getting bigger and better every month and capturing the market. Here a slew of new titles coming to Tizen Store every day, whether you’re a casual gamer or you want something with a better more, there’re usually a bunch of games coming out to suit everyone’s taste.
Let’s take a look at the best new Tizen games from the recent times!
You can find the game on Tizen Store. Click here!

dd2b60ba-dc0d-48bf-8974-f445dd2d2011_zps     Highway Racing

Check it out in Tizen Store..!

Highway Racing in real life is too dangerous but on your device it is a carefully designed and crafted racing game. If you love to race and speed is in your blood this game is for you. The game is very easy to control but in high speed, your skill comes to your rescue. Cruise along straight highways at great speed and avoid hitting obstacles or other vehicles. If you zip past other vehicles you score more.

06013106-ff4b-429d-8540-828946fbfe7a_zps   Jalebi - A Desi Word Game

Download Indian Desi Word Game for free now on Tizen Device!

About Jalebi:-
Do word search in this word games to find the hidden words. Solve words with friends and challenge them to guess the word. Jalebi – A Desi Word Game is the India’s first multilingual word games for adults, word games for kids and also Google featured as #1 word games for free. Tap your finger over the crossword grid and see the puzzle breakdown in our word quiz games challenge as a word master. In this word search trivia cracks your brain with ultimate word puzzles.

 

6ec90114-f1ae-4733-857a-8d0cc7106338_zps  Real Can Knockdown

Download Real Can Knockdown Game for free now on Tizen Device!

What's there in Real Can Knockdown?
Real Can Knockdown is an unlimited arcade based tower-destruction shooting game packed with specific powered cans, exciting modes and of course a great gameplay! The objective is straight - knock down cans with the ball. However, the game is easy to play but hard to master and knocking down cans arranged in unique setups like pyramid and more while avoiding obstacles can be really challenging.

556d779d-1d71-4a2b-91f2-835b7cd53e1b_zps  Basketball Street Hero

Do you like street basketball games? If yes, grab the No.1 challenging street game “Basketball street hero” from the Tizen Store!

Keep your eyes at basket, set the pace and angle right to make great striking moves in the basket.
Basketball street hero includes - Game brings the most popular street basketball machine to your device. Aim the basket and make a perfect basketball shot. This brand new arcade hoops game gives an ultimate experience with unique shots and basketball techniques with our challenging superhero.

16b8d0b4-48e8-4c58-ab25-96e3aab1ff10_zps  Real Bowling Strike

Strike the Bowling Pins on your Tizen Device NOW..!

Get ready to strike the 10 pins, Grab the ball and flick to smash on your Tizen Device now with ultimate Real Bowling Strike 10 Pin Game.

About Game -
This ultimate arcade 3d bowling game is packed with exciting modes and you can become real bowling king by enjoying this simulating bowling gameplay and stunning neon graphics!!

48d4dece-a260-4fd5-bdb1-794e2da3fd10_zps  Let's play! AA 3D

Download AA 3D Game for free now on Tizen Device!

Think your timing and strategizing skills are excellent?? Try your hand at this game and test your skills.

About Game:-

A deadly aim and apt timing are crucial skills for winning Crazy AA Wheel 3D Game!! No zigzag swerves, no random shots, the strike must be perfect! Overlapping of swords is to be avoided so you don’t lose. Try this addictive game, test your precision and focus as you shoot out swords one after the other, much like a game of darts where you try and hit the bulls eye right at the center of the circle.

60300a27-9de2-4738-8981-0457f79ecc43_zps  Golf Flick Mini Challenge

Download the ultimate fun golf game - Golf Flick Mini Challenge is now available on Tizen Store!

This pocket game is packed with exciting environments, game modes involves putting the ball at the right time.
What to do?
All you need to do is to flick, spin and curve the shots to try and sink that perfect hole in one. 
Enjoy and play the game through 3 different adventurous game modes.Extra Level gives you 3 chances while ‘Hole in One’ only one to put as many as balls possible in the hole.However,With Time Trials you get one minute to putt the Ball and for every successful putt you get 5 extra seconds to play with.   
 

Download it for your Tizen Device now!:)

For more Tizen Game click here! http://tizenmobilegames.blogspot.in/

For more fun, Staytuned to Dumadu Game
 

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