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sqlite3.dll load on z2 fails on z4


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Hi Guys\Gals,

so this time I tried to make a build for "Tizen Z4" device, and this time the application failed to load sqlite3.dll library which (same tpk) when I try to run in "Tizen Z2", it works.

Error: DllNotFoundException: sqlite3.dll

Description\LogFiles: No Description

Even though I have the DLL file inside my project as you can see the build works in Z2 but somehow the build is not working for Z4.

 

 

 

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