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Galaxy Store: Acquisition Tools and User Attribution


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Galaxy Store sellers running user acquisition campaigns can see detailed user attribution reports within Galaxy Store Statistics. Our newest documentation details how these statistics are organized to allow you to see which campaigns are most effective.

If you are using a third-party mobile management partner such as Appsflyer, Adjust, Branch, Kochava, or Singular, these tools are now integrated with Galaxy Store. Take control of your app's success and understand where users find your content.

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      ▲ Steve McCurry
       
       
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      I have always had a desire to travel and push boundaries. After graduating from Pennsylvania State University and working at a newspaper for two years, I bought a one-way ticket to India with the money I had saved. I spent two years traveling throughout India and Nepal, photographing for a variety of magazines.
       
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      ▲ “Dal Lake,” Srinagar, Kashmir (1999)
       
      ▲ “Boat in India,” Srinagar, Kashmir (1999)
       
       
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      I will soon be traveling to Antarctica and working on a new book of short stories.
       
      Visit the Samsung Art Store in The Frame to see more of Steve McCurry’s work.
       
       
      1 (In Kashmir) A light, flat-bottomed houseboat.
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    • By Samsung Newsroom
      Few artists are as well known and beloved as Vincent van Gogh. From “Almond Blossom” and “Sunflowers” to his iconic self-portraits and striking impressionist works, Van Gogh is recognized worldwide for his use of bold colors and dramatic brush strokes. Housing the largest collection of Van Gogh’s art in the world, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, is dedicated to the work of both the artist and his contemporaries.
       
      ▲ The Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
       
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      Democratizing Access to Art With Samsung Art Store
      Q: Could you give us an overview of your role at the Van Gogh Museum?
       
      As Head of Business Development Asia at the Van Gogh Museum, I am responsible for partnerships and licensing in Asia. My work primarily involves building the museum’s presence within the Asian market, collaborating with notable brands to expand reach and managing these partnerships to ensure they align with the values and goals of the Van Gogh Museum.
       
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      Our approach when selecting art pieces for Samsung Art Store has evolved since 2018. Now, we carefully consider the preferences and trends among global audiences and aim to showcase a diverse collection of Van Gogh’s work that resonates with different cultures and tastes. Over the years, Van Gogh’s art has become immensely popular with The Frame users — as both his famous pieces and lesser-known works have attracted massive viewership.
       
      ▲ “Self-Portrait with Grey Felt Hat” (1887)
       
      Q: What is the significance of making Van Gogh’s work available to large audiences through a platform like Samsung Art Store?
       
      Platforms such as Samsung Art Store democratize access to art, allowing people to experience Van Gogh’s creativity without needing to travel. In addition, his pieces are exposed to new audiences who might not otherwise have the opportunity to engage with them.
       
       
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      ▲ “Sunflowers” (1889)
       
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      For our first anniversary, the museum held an exhibition for visitors to explore the history of the institute. Without the unconditional support from the Van Gogh family, the museum simply would not exist.
       
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      ▲ “Wheatfield Under Thunderclouds” (1890)
       
      Next, I’d recommend “Fishing Boats on the Beach at Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer.” The vibrant blue shades of the sea and sky juxtaposed against the colorful boats makes this painting ideal for The Frame. The screen’s ability to render vibrant colors brings the scene to life, enhancing the painting’s lively and dynamic nature.
       
      ▲ “Fishing Boats on the Beach at Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer” (1888)
       
      My third pick would be “Landscape at Twilight,” a painting depicting a twilight sky and rural landscape. The Frame’s display accurately captures these subtle nuances in colors — making the idyllic piece a calming addition to any room.
       
      ▲ “Landscape at Twilight” (1890)
       
       
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      Q: How has technology impacted the Van Gogh Museum since its opening in 1973?
      Our mission is to inspire diverse audiences with the art and life of Vincent van Gogh, and we are always searching for new ways to do so. As such, we’ve incorporated new technologies both inside the museum and online to further preserve Van Gogh’s legacy for future generations.
       
      Q: How does The Frame elevate the viewing experience of art?
      The focus of the museum has always been to showcase our expansive Van Gogh collection. Offering this collection of masterpieces on The Frame gives users an opportunity to enjoy Vincent van Gogh’s world-famous paintings from home. Of course, we hope people will also be inspired to come and enjoy the art in person at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam as well.
       
      Q: In December, Samsung Art Store will feature a curated Van Gogh collection called “Van Gogh in Winter.” What can viewers expect to see in this collection?
      We are thrilled to bring a carefully crafted selection of artwork to Samsung Art Store. Each masterpiece — from the vivid “The Bedroom” to the serene “Snow-Covered Field with a Harrow (after Millet)” — encapsulates Van Gogh’s revolutionary use of color and emotive landscapes.
       
      The “Van Gogh in Winter” collection offers a unique window into Van Gogh’s world, showcasing his evolution as an artist and his enduring impact on art history. We invite viewers to immerse themselves in these classic works and experience Van Gogh’s art in a new vibrant, digital format.
       
      ▲ “The Bedroom” (1888)
       
      ▲ “Snow-Covered Field with a Harrow (after Millet)” (1890)
       
      Q: Are there any upcoming events at the museum?
      Visitors can enjoy the special “Pokémon x Van Gogh Museum” activities in the museum until January 7, 2024. “Matthew Wong l Vincent van Gogh: Painting as a Last Resort” will then open in early March — a temporary exhibition inviting attendees to discover the colorful and expressive art of Matthew Wong and his artistic connection with Vincent van Gogh.
       
      Visit Samsung Art Store in The Frame to see more of the Van Gogh collection.
      View the full article
    • By Samsung Newsroom
      The Samsung Art Store continues to captivate the hearts of art enthusiasts worldwide — transforming living spaces into galleries with an extensive collection of artwork and photographs. Recently, New York-based artist Saya Woolfalk has garnered significant attention for her captivating and otherworldly creations.
       
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      Saya Woolfalk is a New York-based artist who masterfully blends science fiction and fantasy to reshape our understanding of reality. Her art takes the form of vibrant sculptures, installations and digital works — celebrating the fusion of different races and cultures.  
      ▲ Saya Woolfalk
       
       
      Origins of Imagination: Saya Woolfalk’s Artistic Journey and Background
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      I’ve been working as a professional artist for around 20 years, but my journey as an artist began during my childhood. Growing up in New York and spending summers with my grandmother in Gifu, Japan, exposed me to a rich multicultural environment that influenced me significantly. When I began to make art in college, I pulled from this experience and found inspiration for my work. My family in Japan owned a textile company, and my grandmother taught me how to sew. As a result, most of my early work was in textiles. Looking back on those formative years, I now see most of my work as a form of quilt or textile collage — inspired by the time I spent creating with my maternal grandmother.
       
      Within the realm of my artistic endeavors, I focus on creating worlds where diverse cultural elements collide, clash and mingle. We live in a multicultural world where people from various backgrounds cohabitate on a single planet. I strive to produce art that explores this complicated experience.
       
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      I start with drawing and painting when beginning a new piece. Then, I move on to digital rendering. My artistic process is fluid, as I’m constantly flowing between the analog and digital worlds. Amidst this dynamic interplay, my digital renderings are essentially speculative spaces where I imagine something and then build it.
       
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      ▲ “Starship 1,” 2022
       
       
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      Being featured in the Samsung Art Store for Women’s History Month was exhilarating, fulfilling and incredibly rewarding. I received many congratulatory messages from friends, adding to the joy of the moment.
       
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      Q: How did you select the works that are currently displayed in the Art Store? Can you recommend some of your favorite pieces to The Frame users?
       
      Growing up in an increasingly digital world full of technological advancements, I have always embraced technology as an integral part of my artistic journey and an innovative way to express myself. When considering which pieces to display, I carefully choose those that would be most visually appealing on a digital screen. I worked with curator Daria Brit Greene and we selected artwork that would appeal to The Frame’s vibrant and life-like screen.
       
      While it was challenging to pick my favorites, the first piece I recommend would undoubtedly be “Daydreams of Paper Animals.” This particular artwork is a digital collage I made for a large mural at a public school in the Queens neighborhood of New York City. We printed it on tile and added hand-built details that the students could touch! Making public art is very different from making work for museums — in a way, the primary audience is the people who will interact with the pieces every day. So, I tried to get into the mindset of the kids, think about what they care about and then amplify those ideas. Imagination, or the ability to problem-solve complicated situations through creativity, is incredibly important. This artwork encourages the children to tap into that imaginative potential and inspires them to daydream when they interact with the mural every day.
       
      ▲ “Daydreams of Paper Animals,” 2017
       
      The second piece would be the “Encyclopedia of Cloud Divination,” a captivating digital collage that was made into limited-edition prints. These pieces were the beginning of a process I now use quite often in my work. I combined traditional print methods with digital print processes to create a unique composite of the two worlds. Animations and posters were made from this piece, making my artwork more accessible to the general public.
       
      ▲ “Encyclopedia of Cloud Divination (Plate 1),” 2018
       
      ▲ “Encyclopedia of Cloud Divination (Plate 2),” 2018
       
       
      Looking to the Future
      Q: As an artist who blends elements of technology into art, how has your use of technology evolved throughout the course of your career? What do you think the future will look like?
       
      Throughout my artistic journey, technology has been an indispensable tool — from software like Photoshop to AR and VR for immersive video installations. I don’t have a definitive answer as to what the future of art will look like because I believe it will depend on how each artist integrates technology within their pieces. However, I do like the idea that art can be made more accessible through technology, just like how Samsung is doing.
       
       
      Q: Can you tell us about any upcoming projects?
       
      I am excited to announce a solo survey showcasing 20 years of my artwork at the Museum of Art and Design in New York in 2025! Please stay tuned for this exclusive exhibition.
       
      Saya Woolfalk’s artwork will be featured in the November collection, “FALL, ABSTRACTED” on the Samsung Art Store.
       
      Visit the Samsung Art Store in The Frame to see more of Saya’s incredible masterpieces.
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