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Prime Time Design: Unpacking the Creative Process with Ramon Campos from Friss in Motion


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Design inspiration is all around us; however, tapping into it is another story. Fortunately, there are members of the Samsung Developers community who’ve cracked the code and defeated designer’s block. We connected with several watch faces/themes designers and over the last few weeks we have been sharing their advice, creative processes, and sources of design inspiration.

We conclude our ‘Prime Time Design’ series with Ramon Campos from Friss in Motion. Based in the United States, Ramon’s watch faces are inspired by technology, science fiction and nature. Read on to learn about his design process and how he’s incorporating animation into his watch faces to stand out from the competition.

When and why did you start designing watch faces?

I started designing watch faces about six years ago as a hobby, creating designs for my own watch. I developed the habit of sharing my designs with other users and noticed they were popular. I soon realized it could be an opportunity to make money for my design work. As for themes, I started last year in January 2020. It has been an arduous experience, but also exciting and rewarding.


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What does your design process look like? Do you have a strict protocol or is it more free flowing?

For me, the design process varies every time. There is no specific protocol; some designs have taken a very short time to complete, others have taken months. However, one thing on my mind during the design process is how to stand out from the competition. So, I think about how to design watch faces that show different characteristics. That’s why most of my designs are animated, although I also have experience in digital and analog design.

How has your design approach evolved over time?

My design process has evolved a lot. My first watch faces took a lot of time to finish, but now if I have a defined idea, it is easy to work on the project. The same can be said of my animated designs. I had to study hard to learn the computer programs, but over time it has made my work easier.

What was the inspiration for your most successful watch face and how did you make it a reality?

I really like technology, science fiction, nature and watches, so those four things are my source of design inspiration.


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How do you strike a balance between the vision you have for a watch face and its functionality? Is this the most challenging part of the design process?

In my case, I have not had any complications with balancing my vision and functionality. Most of my designs are focused on health features and I have always had the confidence to ask the Samsung Developers team for their recommendations to help make my process easier.

How do you navigate guidelines without compromising the integrity of your design?

I think we all like flashy designs, but at the same time the information on the screen needs to be easy to read and locate. Due to my design style, this is probably one of my biggest challenges.

What’s the one piece of advice you’d give a designer who is stuck in a creative rut?

Express all your talent without fear and do not give up; there is a long way to go and your goals are not impossible to achieve.


Thanks to Ramon for sharing helpful advice on the design process, staying creative and finding inspiration for Galaxy Watch Face designs. You can connect with Ramon and Friss in Motion on Instagram and Facebook.

We hope you found our ‘Prime Time Design’ series inspiring and informative to help you on your journey to designing for Samsung devices. Don’t forget, there’s still time to submit your Galaxy Watch Faces or Themes portfolio before the submission window closes on February 23rd.

Follow us on Twitter at @samsung_dev for more developer interviews and tips for building games, apps, and more for the Galaxy Store.

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