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[Video] Reducing Disposable Battery Waste With Samsung’s Solar Cell Remote Control


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Every year, around 15 billion batteries are used worldwide – but only 2% of these end up being recycled. In order to find a way to help mitigate this growing environmental issue, Samsung Electronics has developed the innovative solar cell-powered remote control for its TV products.

 

As part of Samsung’s efforts towards creating eco-conscious products and services across all areas of its business operations, the Samsung TV’s solar cell-powered remote control is powered by lighting instead of conventional disposable batteries and can be recharged using sunlight, indoor lighting or USB.

 

Take a look at the video below to learn more about the sustainable – yet high-performing – Samsung’s SolarCell Remote.

 

 

Meanwhile, Samsung Electronics strives to incorporate environmental sustainability into everything we do. Our products are thoughtfully designed to minimize the impact on the environment during their entire lifecycle – from planning and manufacturing to consumption and recycling.

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