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[Interview] Saatchi Art and Samsung The Frame Art Store Take Virtual Art to a Next Level


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Samsung’s Art Store boasts an extensive library of artwork thanks to its expansive partnerships with artists and galleries around the world. Its partnership with renowned digital art gallery and network Saatchi Art has brought some of the most highly viewed artworks in the Art Store to home, and is one of Samsung’s longest-standing partners since the 2017 launch of The Frame.

 

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Based on the partnership with Saatchi Art, Samsung introduced ‘The Frame X Saatchi Art’ gallery at the London Design Festival in 2017

 

Samsung Newsroom spoke to Sarah Meller, Senior Director of Brand and Marketing Strategy at Saatchi Art, about the partnership and the network’s perspective on digital art and the Art Store, giving you a closer look into the relationship that takes the virtual art world to a new level.

 

 

Q: So, what made you decide to collaborate with the Art Store in the beginning?

 

We wanted to be at the forefront of using technology to bring the art world to people on a global scale. By partnering with The Frame, we felt that it would make art a more integral part of people’s lives, leading to a greater appreciation of it overall, which is such a good thing.

 

 

Q: What piece would you recommend to users to enjoy through The Frame’s Art Mode?

 

It’s difficult to pick just one. Saatchi Art’s chief curator, Rebecca Wilson, chose several art pieces for The Frame that stand as a testament to the TV’s versatility. They are as diverse and equally stunning as each other, and include everything from Claire Desjardin’s abstract paintings to Dean West’s fine art landscape photography.

 

If I had to choose a few, I would recommend:

 

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  • Dancer: Gama #0 by Cody Choi: The contemporary photographer and choreographer who is best known for his stunning, figurative portraits of dancers in motion. As a dancer himself, Cody can masterfully capture the dynamism and passion of his subjects.

 

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  • Boomerang House by Cécile Van Hanja: She is best known for her abstracted renditions of modern architectural spaces. Cécile’s paintings depicting homes and pools immediately transport guests to mid-century spaces.

 

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  • Winter Warm II by Sandy Dooley: She is an impressionist artist who spontaneously splatters paint with vibrant hues that characterize her harmonious landscapes, inspired by memories of growing up in the English countryside.

 

 

Q: How do you think the Art Store has evolved since you first partnered with Samsung? What are some of the improvements that stand out the most?

 

Since we partnered with the Art Store in 2017, its selection has grown tremendously, which has been very inspiring. It’s been wonderful to see iconic institutions like the Musée du Louvre join in and bring museum-quality art into the homes of viewers around the world.

 

 

Q: How has Saatchi Art evolved since you first partnered with Samsung?

 

At Saatchi Art, we support our artists as they explore emerging mediums and styles. We have been increasing our offerings in the digital art and NFT space. And we are thrilled because not only do NFTs offer real practical benefits to artists, but also give them a new medium in which to express their creativity. We are excited to evolve our mission into this space.

 

 

Q: How do you feel about technology changing the way in which people appreciate art?

 

Technology has provided us with many benefits when it comes to the arts. While real-life art experiences will never go away, nor should they, technological advances like the ones shown through the Art Store are transforming the way people access and consume art. Ultimately, these changes lead to more democratization, more diversity, more experimentation and more creativity.

 

Another benefit of The Frame is the lighting and the subsequent colors it creates. Lighting is so key when it comes to displaying art. The fact that The Frame can automatically adjust the screen’s brightness as lighting conditions change helps to maintain the natural colors of the artworks, ensuring a great viewing experience for consumers.

 

To see art from this partnership with Saatchi Art, head to the Art Store on The Frame.

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