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Just bought 43" Class 7 Series LED 4K UHD Smart Tizen TV - UN43TU7000FXZA


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I just bought a 43" Class 7 Series LED 4K UHD Smart Tizen TV - UN43TU7000FXZA from Best Buy. It cost me $299.99. I was thinking about waiting until  the Presidents day sales but ended up getting it. The picture is very good but a little dimmer than I thought. 4K programming is great and I'm liking the samsung channels plus so far. Any suggestion on what to download? So far have netflix, disney, and amazon set up.

 

UN43TU7000FXZA

UN43TU7000FXZA Samsung

43" Class 7 Series LED 4K UHD Smart Tizen TV

43" Class 7 Series LED 4K UHD

 

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