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[CES 2022] Experts Behind Samsung’s Newest Products and Technologies Discuss Innovating for the Future ①


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We live in a fast-changing world that requires us to be constantly innovating and adapting. In line with this trend, Samsung Electronics’ latest products and technologies propose exciting new directions for various aspects of daily life.

 

CES 2022 offers visitors and online viewers an opportunity to see for themselves how Samsung has been innovating for the future. From displays and home appliances, to products and services that raise the bar for innovation, the company’s showcase at the world’s largest technology show offers a peek at what our daily lives will look like very soon.

 

Samsung’s CES 2022 booth is full of eye-catching innovations. But which products and technologies will viewers and visitors absolutely not want to miss? To answer that question, Samsung Newsroom went straight to the source, asking the experts behind the innovations which ones they think deserve a closer look.

 

In part one of this two-part series, Telly Lee, Vice President of Samsung’s Home Appliances Division and Jungrae Kim of Samsung Electronics’ Visual Display Business will explain how Samsung designed its latest home appliances and portable screen to cater to consumers’ evolving lifestyles.

 

 

The Bespoke Kitchen: Home Appliances That Evolve in Line With Users’ Changing Lives

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▲ Telly Lee, Vice President of Samsung’s Home Appliances Division and Head of the Kitchen Product Planning Group, with Samsung’s Bespoke French Door refrigerators

 

 

Q: What can you tell us about the home appliance products and technologies that are being showcased at CES 2022?

 

We are going to focus on introducing the Bespoke kitchen, in which refrigerators and colors are unified to great effect. The Bespoke kitchen begins with our flagship Bespoke refrigerators. We’ve expanded the Bespoke range to FDR (French Door refrigerators) in the U.S. market in 4-door and 3-door models. This represents a significant expansion of our lineup following the release of Bespoke refrigerators in 4-Door Flex, Bottom Mount Freezer and 1-Door Column types in 2021.

 

One unique point of innovation for Samsung’s Bespoke refrigerator is the Beverage Center. Featuring a water dispenser hidden inside the door, the Beverage Center offers a convenient, hygienic solution that enables the fridge to feature a smooth exterior. Along with the new Bespoke refrigerators, we’re also showcasing other vibrant and colorful products that are part of the Bespoke kitchen like oven ranges and dishwashers.

 

These days, we’re seeing more customers in the U.S. choose modern designs for their kitchens. With Bespoke, we want to show that it’s possible to decorate your kitchen based on your individual tastes with a palette that includes colors that blend in with your interior, as well as accent colors.

 

At CES, we are also showcasing SmartThings Cooking, a service that introduces connected experiences to the kitchen. With this service, users can receive recipe recommendations and information to help them save time on both prep and cooking. SmartThings Cooking recommends recipes that fit your tastes and dietary restrictions, then builds meal plans to match. As you’re cooking, it also sends recipe instructions directly to synced Samsung cooking devices.

 

 

Q: What are some unique or attractive aspects of the new Bespoke offerings that you don’t want visitors at CES to miss?

 

First, I’d like to underline the expansion of the Bespoke range, which gives consumers who want their refrigerator to reflect their preferences in terms of color and materials even more options to choose from. Since launching Bespoke in the U.S. in 2021, we’ve seen continuous demand for this type of customization. Delivering on this is one of the reasons we added the French Door refrigerator to our 2022 Bespoke refrigerator lineup. The panels come in twelve colors, which means that there are over 20,000 possible color combinations for a four-door refrigerator alone. I am confident that no other refrigerator offers customers this much choice.

 

Another can’t-miss aspect is the features. The Beverage Center, for instance includes a 1.4-liter AutoFill water pitcher, as well as a Dual Auto Ice Maker that holds up to 4.1kg of ice. What’s more, the FlexZone offers five different temperature modes to keep ingredients like meat, seafood, fruits and vegetables at optimal temperatures. These unique features help bring greater convenience to users’ daily lives.

 

Users also get to experience an even smarter kitchen with Family Hub, which is included in the latest Bespoke refrigerator lineup. By using the large screen on the front of the refrigerator users can enjoy music and videos in the kitchen and control kitchen appliances and smart devices too. With a screen that integrates seamlessly into the door panel, and with a highly aesthetic design and minimized bezels, the Bespoke Family Hub is capable of blending into any space.

 

Last but not least, we are introducing the Bespoke Atelier app that we first launched in Korea to the global market. The app offers access to more than 170 works of art from global artists, covering various periods, trends and themes. It recommends works of art and allows you to create your own gallery of sorts by customizing your display to suit your tastes. In addition, when users display an artwork in listening mode, they’ll be able to hear a description of the art with subtitles. This makes it feel like you’re enjoying a guided tour an art museum from the comfort of your kitchen.

 

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▲ Samsung’s Bespoke Family Hub refrigerator

 

 

Q: Our way of life has changed dramatically over the past two years, with technology that connects people becoming more important as contactless ways of doing things increasingly become the norm. What kind of impact do you think the products and technologies showcased at CES 2022 will have on people’s lives?

 

As users have begun to spend more and more time at home, their lives have become more “home-centric”. We expect this trend to continue in 2022. At the same time, concern for sustainability continues to increase on the heels of events like the United Nations’ COP26 conference, and with environmental regulations being strengthened across the globe. With these shifts in consumer lifestyles and interests in mind, Samsung has been working to provide kitchen solutions that are “customized, smarter, and more sustainable.”

 

Our customized kitchen solutions cater to users who have been spending a lot of time in their kitchen and thus feel a stronger desire to remodel their space to reflect their tastes. By expanding our Bespoke lineup, we are providing a more diverse range of refrigerator types and color options, helping users build customized kitchens that suit both their lifestyle and their interior design scheme.

 

Spending more time at home has naturally led to a rise in home cooking as well. To help make this easier by making kitchens “smarter”, Samsung introduced SmartThings Cooking, a tailored cooking journey service that does everything from looking up recipes to creating a diet plan and even shops for groceries. Powered by Whisk’s Food AI, SmartThings Cooking recommends your personalized recipe and meal plans based on your tastes, dietary needs and groceries you have on hand. The service also allows you to enjoy convenient one-stop grocery shopping with your favorite grocery retail brands available through the Whisk network. When it comes time to cook, SmartThings ensures a seamless cooking experience while communicating directly with your smart Samsung kitchen appliances.

 

And with Family Hub, consumers can even utilize this service through the display on the front of their fridge while continuing to control other home appliances from it as well.

 

Finally, our kitchen solutions are becoming “more sustainable.” Bespoke refrigerators are built for high energy efficiency, and their replaceable door panels help extend their lifespans. Samsung continues to innovate on this front, seeking out ways to incorporate cutting-edge technology into our appliances while keeping sustainability in mind as well.

 

 

The Freestyle : Designing a Screen That’s Not Limited by Space

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▲ Jungrae Kim of Samsung Electronics’ Visual Display Business proudly displays The Freestyle, a new portable screen introduced at CES.

 

 

Q: Could you walk us through how your team came up with The Freestyle?

 

Ever since the pandemic changed our daily lives, our personal spaces have become more and more important. This is particularly true of relaxing spaces like the bedroom, where we’re seeing more people using products for the purposes of entertainment. We’re also seeing more people utilize cozy and quiet spaces in their homes, as well as increased interest in spending time outdoors – by going camping, for example. We wanted to reflect these trends of our time in our products, and enable users to use them as they wish – anytime, anywhere, and regardless of space limitations. That’s how we came up with the personal, movable smart screen that is The Freestyle.

 

 

Q: What are unique points of the Freestyle?

 

The Freestyle was designed to offer users new levels of functionality. It’s easy to see what sets this product apart just by looking at it. To allow users to carry around every day, we designed The Freestyle to be lightweight, weighing just 830 grams. The fact that you can conveniently carry it with you wherever you go is its biggest advantage.

 

The Freestyle also features a simpler installation process. All users need to do is place The Freestyle wherever they want, and then turn it on. That’s it. The Freestyle comes with full auto keystone and auto leveling features, enabled by industry-leading technology. The features allow the device to automatically adjust its screen to any surface at any angle, providing a perfectly proportional image every time.

 

Users can enjoy a seamless and continuous viewing experience by accessing their user accounts and settings for major OTT services. On top of that, we’ve also applied the industry’s first far-field voice control technology. So when the screen is turned on, users can search for content using just their voice. When the screen is off, they can use the device to listen to music or ask for the day’s weather just as they would with a smart speaker.

 

The Freestyle’s picture and sound quality – the most basic and important features of any display – also deserve a closer look. We applied Samsung TVs’ picture quality engine, and the white balance is adjusted automatically according to the color and tone of the wall that the screen is being projected to. We also applied dual passive radiators to produce deep, high-quality bass. This allows customers to enjoy a cinema-quality sound experience no matter where they are.

 

CES-experts-behind-innovative-1_main4F.j

 

 

Q: In line with Samsung’s ‘Screens Everywhere’ vision, The Freestyle can be utilized in various ways for maximum convenience. What are some specific use cases for The Freestyle?

 

First of all, The Freestyle can be conveniently set up in a user’s bedroom. While lying in bed, before falling asleep, they can use the device’s integrated cradle to move the screen from the wall to the ceiling to continue watching a movie more comfortably. The Freestyle can also be placed lightly on a dining room table, transforming the room into a new space for entertainment.

 

In order to utilize spaces like this, our developers came up with a new installation solution that we applied to the product. Thanks to those efforts, users can also utilize the device on a tabletop or floor by connecting it to a standard E26 light socket.1 There’s no need for a separate power supply or cable connection, so it can be used immediately.

 

For powering it up, The Freestyle is compatible with external batteries2 that support USB-PD and 50W/20V output or above, so users can take it with them anywhere, whether they are on the move, on a camping trip and more. When it’s not used as a projector to stream content, The Freestyle also provides mood lighting effect thanks to its ambient mode and translucent lens cap.

 

Through close cooperation with Samsung’s MX (Mobile eXperience) Business, we’ve equipped The Freestyle with a button that syncs it with Galaxy devices. With just a push of a button, users can instantly use their Galaxy device as a remote control. They can also utilize mobile hotspots when no Wi-Fi networks are available. We’ve developed this product by paying close attention to even the smallest details, all to make the device just as convenient and easy to use outdoors as it is at home.

 

CES-experts-behind-innovative-1-main5FF.

 

 

1 Light socket connection feature will be first applied in US.

2 Samsung is not liable for 3rd party external batteries.

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      Q: In this digital age where most people use their phones as cameras, how do you see the role of professional photographers evolving?
       
      The medium, platform or technology — whether it’s Instagram, digital or film — is not important. Successful photography has to be about telling stories and being creative, having your own interpretation and voice to say what is important to you and conveying those emotions through your photographs.
       
       
      Q: What is next for you in the coming year?
       
      I will soon be traveling to Antarctica and working on a new book of short stories.
       
      Visit the Samsung Art Store in The Frame to see more of Steve McCurry’s work.
       
       
      1 (In Kashmir) A light, flat-bottomed houseboat.
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    • By Samsung Newsroom
      Samsung Electronics today announced that it has become an official partner for Netflix’s upcoming immersive popup experience, “Squid Game: The Trials.” Powered by Samsung’s cutting-edge technology, the immersive pop culture experience brings one of the most engaging, interactive forms of gameplay with Samsung’s latest Smart TVs and Galaxy smartphones.
       
      Fans of the Netflix mega-hit series “Squid Game” and “Squid Game: The Challenge” can now sign up for a one-of-a-kind experience that takes visitors through the iconic sets and lets them compete in games drawn from and inspired by the shows. The new “Squid Game: The Trials” is currently open to visitors to experience in Los Angeles and will run into the new year with plans to expand to various cities around the world.
       

       
      “We are thrilled to partner with Netflix to offer industry-leading entertainment experiences,” said Cheolgi Kim, EVP & Head of Sales and Marketing of Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics. “Through Neo QLED 8K’s stunning picture quality, fans and participants will be able to immerse themselves in the environment and create unforgettable memories.”
       
      “Squid Game: The Trials” takes advantage of Samsung’s cutting-edge TVs and Galaxy mobile devices across the individual games to provide the ultimate immersive experience. Participants will navigate the experiential zones surrounded by Samsung’s flagship Neo QLED 8K, 4K and The Frame, which are placed to enhance the intensity and excitement of the games.
       

       
      At the entrance, Samsung’s flagship Neo QLED 8K welcomes guests by showcasing the “Squid Game: The Challenge” trailer. Thanks to the Neural Quantum Processor 8K, the Neo QLED upscales content into breathtaking 8K resolution in real-time, allowing participants to immediately immerse themselves in the vivid and detailed world of the “Squid Game” universe.
       
      Visitors also can enjoy Samsung’s latest mobile innovation through various experiences with the Galaxy Z Flip5 and Galaxy S23 Ultra. Samsung provides opportunities to experience the most up-to-date technology by incorporating their key features with the most memorable scenes from “Squid Game.”
       

       
      “Samsung’s longstanding relationship with Netflix is based on a shared purpose, which is to fuel passions and help people discover new worlds,” said Stephanie Choi, EVP & Head of Marketing of Mobile eXperience Business at Samsung Electronics. “It is through our open and collaborative relationship that we are able to open portals into new and immersive experiences.”
       
      While playing “Squid Game”’s most iconic Red Light, Green Light the Galaxy S23 Ultra will capture key moments of gameplay with Hyperlapse video and high-quality pictures.
       

       
      With the precision it brings, the S Pen serves as a crucial component in the Digital Dalgona Challenge by helping players throw themselves into the mind-gripping and pressure-sensitive task of cutting delicate shapes out of the Korean candy. Visitors can enjoy the game on the Galaxy S23 Ultra’s immersive ultra-wide screen and challenge themselves with five levels of difficulty. Players can also check where they rank against competitors on the leaderboard. Furthermore, the S Pen can also be used to capture in-game photos for sharing after completion.
       
      Photos from both games can be shared instantly via Quick Share1 or downloaded through email. There will also be a FlexCam Selfie Kiosk, where the Galaxy Z Flip5’s FlexCam enables visitors to take hands-free photos from different angles and download them to be framed.
       
      Following the games, participants can retreat to the VIP room, where they can observe ongoing challenges on The Frame’s expansive 85-inch screen. The Lifestyle TV — with its latest Matte Display technology — offers a premium viewing experience that replicates the commanding ambiance of the Front Man’s quarters in the series.
       
       
      Availability
      Fans of the Netflix “Squid Game” universe can find more information and buy tickets to the Los Angeles “Squid Game: The Trials” at https://www.netflix.com/tudum/squid-game-the-trials or on Ticketmaster.com. Tickets are now available and running for a limited time through the new year.
       
       
      1 Quick Share is available on Galaxy Smartphones, Galaxy Tabs, and Galaxy Books, on Android 10 and One UI2.1 and above. Available devices and features may subject to change. Requires BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy) and Wi-Fi Direct connection to enable Quick Share.
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    • By Samsung Newsroom
      Samsung Electronics America announced it has brought Samsung display technologies to the highly anticipated FORMULA 1 HEINEKEN SILVER LAS VEGAS GRAND PRIX 2023 through its partnership with Liberty Media and Las Vegas Grand Prix, Inc. With lights out on November 18, spectators attending the race in Las Vegas or watching from around the world will see Samsung display technologies shine bright throughout the Las Vegas Grand Prix pit building, including 3 extra-large grandstand screens with a total of 3.8 million pixels, a dynamic tight-pitch display that serves as a backdrop for the entry escalator as well as a new “star” in the sky an LED display in the form of the F1 logo — the dazzling LED display that sits atop the 1,000-foot-long pit building rooftop that’s so bright, it may even be visible from outer space.
       

       
      “As F1’s viewership skyrockets in the U.S., Liberty Media and the Las Vegas Grand Prix are focused on delivering the most memorable experiences for fans in attendance as well as viewing the broadcast around the world,” said James Fishler, Senior Vice President of the Display and Home Entertainment Divisions, Samsung Electronics America. “The 2023 Las Vegas Grand Prix is a turning point for the sport of racing, as the installation of these best-in-class Samsung displays dramatically adorns the Las Vegas Grand Prix pit building and revolutionizes how fans in the grandstands watch this race.”
       
       
      F1 Rooftop Logo
      The 28,166-square-foot 10mm LED display with over 22 million pixels spans 481 feet — longer than a football field — and mirrors the shape of the F1 logo, exciting viewers watching from home as broadcasters use the sign to provide more immersive and close-up views of the race.
       

       
       
      Escalator Trapezoid
      The 1,480-square-foot 3.9mm LED escalator display is designed to create a “wow” moment as it presents stunning content using over 9 million pixels.
       
       
      Grandstand
      The grandstands are outfitted with three 941-square-foot Samsung 8mm LED displays with over 1.2 million pixels to enhance the viewing experience for all in-person attendees, ensuring that a moment of the action is not missed. The new displays feature Samsung’s latest and most advanced HDR10+ technology, with over 8,000-nit brightness, to provide the most dynamic image quality even on the sunniest of days.
       
      The F1 Rooftop Logo, Escalator Trapezoid and three Grandstand displays feature over 33 million Samsung LED pixels and over 32,000 square feet and together, are long enough to lap the Las Vegas Strip Circuit two and a half times.
       

       
      “Las Vegas is primed to host an F1 Grand Prix event of the most impressive magnitude, and we are excited to deliver heightened experiences for our fans,” said Renee Wilm, Chief Executive Officer of Las Vegas Grand Prix, Inc. “Through our partnership, we are achieving this goal with the innovative technology that Samsung has brought to the Las Vegas Strip Circuit.”
       
      Samsung’s partnership with Liberty Media and Las Vegas Grand Prix, Inc. is just one of the many ways the company is revolutionizing the fan experience across professional sports leagues. In addition to the displays featured onsite at the Formula 1 Las Vegas Grand Prix, Samsung powers state-of-the-art LED technology at notable venues from across the nation, including Hollywood Park, Citi Field and Minute Maid Park. Samsung also brings the excitement of the stadium and racetrack into the living room with its line-up of Samsung Neo QLED 8K and 4K class TVs featuring lifelike picture and sound. For Formula 1 fans looking to get behind the wheel, the Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 curved monitor delivers an immersive racing game experience with seamless, hyper-fast action and unrivaled UHD color and depth.
       
      To learn more about Samsung’s Live Events and Sports Signage solutions, please visit: https://www.samsung.com/us/business/solutions/industries/live-events-sports/displays/.
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