Quantcast
Jump to content


[Interview] A Deep Dive Into 8K: Underwater Cinematographer Pawel Achtel on New Era of High-Resolution Filmmaking


Recommended Posts

The world of videography and filmmaking is constantly evolving, with new technologies pushing the boundaries of what’s possible. The latest of these technologies is 8K resolution video which offers a new level of detail and clarity that was previously unimaginable. With 8K, filmmakers and videographers can capture images — both above and below sea level — in incredible precision and realism, giving TV viewers a truly immersive viewing experience.

 

Editorial-Pawel-Achtel-Underwater-Cinema

▲ Pawel Achtel is a world-renowned professional in underwater cinematography with a career spanning over 35 years and more than 5,000 dives ranging from the equator to Antarctica

 

Meet Pawel Achtel, a world-renowned professional in underwater cinematography with a career spanning over 35 years and more than 5,000 dives ranging from the equator to Antarctica. The filmmaker’s extensive diving experience informs his cinematographic work — which has captured the attention of industry leaders such as National Geographic, BBC and Discovery — providing a unique perspective on life underwater and highlighting his expertise in designing and producing advanced cinematography equipment. He was also involved in capturing 8K resolution underwater sequences for “Avatar: The Way of Water.”

 

Samsung Newsroom sat down with Pawel Achtel to dive into the details of underwater cinematography and explore how Samsung’s Neo QLED 8K lineup is reshaping the landscape for filmmakers and viewers at home.

 

Editorial-Pawel-Achtel-Underwater-Cinema
Editorial-Pawel-Achtel-Underwater-Cinema

▲ An example of Pavel Achtel’s work that captured a humpback whale up close

 

 

How 8K Technology Transforms Underwater Filmmaking

In fields like underwater cinematography, where visuals matter most, Samsung’s Neo QLED 8K is indispensable. Not only does it help viewers feel immersed in the scene, but it is also vital for filmmakers to assess underwater footage.

 

Editorial-Pawel-Achtel-Underwater-Cinema

▲ Underwater cinematographers face a plethora of challenges including ocean currents and light refraction that make optical environments drastically different from on-the-ground filming. But Achtel focuses on the “breathtaking results” that come once the obstacles are overcome (video source: link)

 

Due to variables like ocean currents and light refraction, filming underwater in true 8K quality can be difficult. “But, when all the circumstances line up, the results are breathtaking,” shared Achtel.

 

While advanced technologies like submersible lenses assist in capturing these shots, Neo QLED 8K — known for its high resolution and clarity — allows filmmakers like Achtel to closely examine even the smallest details of underwater scenes. This close look helps improve sharpness and other aspects of image quality after filming, overcoming the challenges of underwater optics.

 

Editorial-Pawel-Achtel-Underwater-Cinema

▲ Samsung’s Neo QLED 8K helps cinematographers closely examine details and improve picture quality

 

“The underwater world is elusive — and filmmakers have a rare opportunity to allow people to see it in great detail, in a way people may not see elsewhere,” said Achtel. “It makes these shots interesting and captivating as they reveal an environment completely foreign to us in stunning detail.”

 

Samsung made waves at CES 2024 by introducing the latest Neo QLED 8K with the new NQ8 AI Gen3 processor, delivering a cinematic experience at home. Impressed by its features, the filmmaker called the TV “a transformative advancement.”

 

He specifically praised features like 8K AI Upscaling Pro and AI Motion Enhancer Pro,1 available on select Neo QLED 8K models, highlighting Samsung’s commitment to outstanding visuals. “Having witnessed the advanced features at CES 2024, I can confidently say they enhance realism and immersion,” added Achtel.

 

Editorial-Pawel-Achtel-Underwater-Cinema

▲ AI Upscaling on compatible Samsung TVs helps enhance resolution to enjoy on larger screens; the 8K AI Upscaling Pro that leverages the new NQ8 AI Gen3 processor on 2024 Samsung Neo QLED 8K models take this technology to a whole new level

 

However, for this underwater cinematographer, the true power of 8K lies in the seamless integration of production and viewing technologies — charting a new course in content creation and consumption.

 

 

Diving Deep Into 8K Home Cinema

As the development and adoption of 8K filming equipment continues to grow, it’s also driving the creation of content that fully embraces the potential of 8K resolution. The unparalleled realism and captivating qualities of 8K make it an essential tool for storytelling, especially for content that demands a powerful visual impact.

 

Take underwater footage, for example, which is often played at a slower pace — giving audiences the time to absorb unfamiliar environments and take in details that might otherwise go unnoticed.

 

Editorial-Pawel-Achtel-Underwater-Cinema

▲ Various factors including currents, light refraction present challenges to capturing clear, beautiful shots underwater

 

On the Neo QLED 8K, viewers can appreciate the “impressive color accuracy” and “nuanced portrayal of detailed scenes” of the ocean’s depths. From the calming blue water to the vivid and bright hues of fish and coral reefs, Achtel attributes the appeal of his 8K underwater imagery to the variety of striking colors and patterns. With Neo QLED 8K, the benefits now extend beyond just the content itself.

 

“On the viewing side, Neo QLED 8K plays a pivotal role in bringing the 8K ecosystem to life,” he explained. “It not only showcases content with remarkable clarity but also upscales lower-resolution footage to nearly 8K quality, ensuring an immersive viewing experience of the highest caliber.”

 

Given its advanced picture quality powered by increased neural networks and cutting-edge AI upscaling features, Neo QLED 8K elevates the viewing experience — even with content not initially captured in 8K. Combining advanced image quality with larger screen sizes also opens new possibilities for home viewing to offer an experience that rivals that of traditional big-screen setups.

 

In the ever-evolving landscape of visual storytelling, enhancing a TV’s ability to process non-8K content offers significant benefits and inspires filmmakers to strive for higher quality content.

 

“At the end of the day, having a device with an enhanced visual experience and immersive capabilities empowers cinematographers to craft and evaluate captivating content that resonates deeply with viewers,” said Achtel.

 

Editorial-Pawel-Achtel-Underwater-Cinema

▲ AI Motion Enhancer Pro helps make 8K viewing experiences even smoother, not only for underwater scenes but also footages with fast-paced action like artists dancing on stage or sporting events

 

The role of 8K technology in underwater cinematography and home entertainment underscores its transformative potential to enhance visual storytelling and enrich the viewing experience for audiences around the world.

 

To learn more about Samsung’s Neo QLED 8K, visit samsung.com.

 

 

1 8K AI Upscaling Pro and AI Motion Enhancer Pro are exclusive features of the QN900D model.

View the full article

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 0
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Days

Top Posters In This Topic

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Similar Topics

    • By Samsung Newsroom
      Since last year, Samsung Art Store users have been able to display iconic artwork from The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met) on The Frame — transforming the TV into a digital canvas that infuses artistic flair into any space. By partnering with Samsung, the public has a chance to view historical artifacts through immersive digital experiences that can be enjoyed from home.
       
      The Met seeks to expand art education while exploring new ways for technology to positively impact cultural exchange and inspire audiences around the world. The goal is to bridge the gap between the past and the present to create a future where beauty and creativity can flourish anywhere.
       
      Samsung Newsroom sat down with Stephen Mannello, Head of Retail and Licensing at The Met, to discuss the partnership with Samsung and how technology can positively influence the museum experience.
       
      ▲ The Metropolitan Museum of Art has partnered with Samsung Art Store to democratize access to its world-class collection of art.
       
       
      A New Partnership for the Digital Age
      Q: What is your role at The Met? How do you influence the museum and visitor experience?
       
      I’m the Head of Retail and Licensing at The Met which means I work with The Met Store and our licensees to develop products, publications and experiences that draw from the museum’s vast collection of art spanning 5,000 years and bring it into the hands of consumers around the world.
       
      My role offers a unique opportunity to create a connection with visitors and consumers through products that engage, educate and inspire them to experience The Met’s 19 different collection areas in new ways. Proceeds from our work go back to support the study, conservation and presentation of The Met’s collection, so there is a tangible impact to the products and experiences we develop.
       
      “We are looking forward to evolving and experimenting with how we continue The Met’s mission to bring art into the everyday, and technology is an essential mode of making that happen.”
       
       
      Q: What was the initial focus for The Met when it began collaborating with Samsung Art Store last fall?
       
      Working with Samsung Art Store allowed us to step into a unique space where technology meets digital innovation and interior design. Our inaugural collection spans time and place to include highlights from The Met’s 17 curatorial departments which users of The Frame can explore and display in their homes.
       
      Sharing these beloved works with Samsung Art Store has allowed us to present a small part of what The Met has to offer to a global audience of art and design lovers like never before — and this is only the beginning of what we hope will be a longstanding relationship. We look forward to sharing more of our collection and exploring different thematic offerings that inspire and delight Samsung Art Store users in the future.
       
       
      Q: Over the past few months, how have The Frame users responded to The Met’s collection?
       
      We were overwhelmed to see how popular artwork from The Met has been on the platform. It is a true testament to the enduring appeal of pieces like Vincent van Gogh’s “Wheat Field with Cypresses” or Emanuel Leutze’s “Washington Crossing the Delaware” — both of which are popular attractions in our galleries and translate beautifully when experienced digitally on The Frame.
       
      ▲ “Wheat Field with Cypresses” by Vincent van Gogh on The Frame
       
       
      Impressionism With The Met and Art Store
      Q: Samsung Art Store will feature a selection of Impressionist works this month from The Met’s collection. What is the significance of this new selection?
       
      The Impressionist movement began in 1874, just four years after The Met was founded. While the two events are independent of each other, there is an interesting parallel in the revolutionary spirit of artists like Edgar Degas and Camille Pissarro — who led the charge in this radical style of artmaking that put a new emphasis on everyday life — and the foundation of The Met which sought to democratize art by bringing it to the masses.
       
      Since the foundation of the movement 150 years ago, The Met has become home to dozens of renowned Impressionist pieces that endure as visitor favorites. The visual splendor of this artwork is supported by so many wonderful stories. For example, “The Monet Family in their Garden at Argenteuil” was painted by Edouard Manet in 1874 while the two artists were vacationing near one another. As this piece was being made, Monet in turn painted Manet, and Renoir simultaneously painted “Madame Monet and Her Son” (now in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.). These works of art speak volumes about the vibrant creative exchange that took place between Impressionists at the outset of the movement.
       
       
      Q: Out of the artwork selected for Samsung Art Store, which three would you recommend for The Frame?
       
      ▲“View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm–The Oxbow” (1836) by Thomas Cole
       
      First is Thomas Cole’s “View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm–The Oxbow” (1836). This impressive Hudson River School landscape painting juxtaposes untamed wilderness and pastoral settlement to spotlight the beauty of American scenery — with a vast array of possible interpretations to the artist’s message. Hidden in the foreground, Cole includes himself at his easel capturing the breathtaking scene. The fine details and enigmatic nature of the work make for captivating viewing at home.
       
      ▲ “Circus Sideshow (Parade de Cirque)” (1887-88) by Georges Seurat
       
      Next is Georges Seurat’s “Circus Sideshow (Parade de Cirque)” (1887-88). This groundbreaking painting is the artist’s first nighttime scene and the first to depict popular entertainment. At the time this piece was made, the parade, or sideshow, was a free attraction designed to lure passersby to purchase tickets to the main circus event. The excellent details of this Pointillist composition are especially easy to appreciate on the Frame.
       
      ▲ “Still Life with Apples and a Pot of Primroses” (ca. 1890) by Paul Cézanne
       
      Finally, I’d recommend Paul Cézanne’s “Still Life with Apples and a Pot of Primroses” (ca. 1890). This elegant still life was once owned by Claude Monet — an enthusiastic gardener — and was gifted to him by the painter Paul Helleu who famously created the astrological ceiling design at Grand Central Station. With its bold colors and graphic lines, this beautiful work demonstrates Cézanne’s mastery of the still life and is sure to enhance any room.
       
       
      Q: In your opinion, how has The Met leveraged The Frame and Samsung Art Store to further support its aspirations to bring audiences across different countries and cultures together and draw unexpected connections?
       
      This digital activation has offered a powerful extension of the museum experience at home. Just like visiting galleries, different works resonate with different people at different moments in their lives. It is exciting to see users continually select and change the artwork on display in their homes to suit their mood, design aesthetic or even season. Visiting museums should be about discovery and curiosity with an element of the unexpected. The Met’s feature on Samsung Art Store is a successful example of translating a physical experience into a digital one.
       
       
      Technology’s Impact on Art and Accessibility
      Q: How do you perceive the impact of art on individuals and its influence on collective culture? How does The Met contribute to that impact?
       
      The Met is a space for everyone to be inspired, learn and discover unexpected connections across time and place. Our collection highlights more than 1.5 million examples of human creative achievement from around the world — allowing visitors to the museum and our website to immerse themselves in art. Experiencing The Met and its pieces offers an opportunity to reflect, ask questions and explore untapped creativity and ideas.
       
      “There is an interesting parallel in the revolutionary spirit of [the Impressionist movement] that put a new emphasis on everyday life and the foundation of The Met which sought to democratize art.”
       
       
      Q: In your opinion, why is it essential to democratize access to art by making it available to a wider audience through platforms like Samsung Art Store?
       
      We believe that art is for all, but many individuals who come to The Met may only visit once in their lifetime. Expanding access through digital activations, products and experiences allows us to have a lasting relationship with art lovers around the world. We hope that sharing The Met’s collection on The Frame can help spark meaningful dialogue about culture and creativity in the past, present and future.
       
       
      Q: What role do you see technology playing in enhancing the museum experience, especially in the context of digital art platforms like Samsung Art Store?
       
      Engaging with art enthusiasts digitally allows us to spotlight pieces across The Met’s collection in new ways, enabling discovery and exploration. That might mean viewing works that are not on display in the galleries, learning the stories behind the art and artists or zooming in on details — but these are just the early possibilities of bringing physical works of art into the digital space. We are looking forward to evolving and experimenting with how we continue The Met’s mission to bring art into the everyday, and technology is an essential mode of making that happen.
      View the full article
    • By Samsung Newsroom
      Shinique Smith is a New York-based artist widely recognized for her monumental fabric sculptures and abstract paintings infused with calligraphy and collages. In her art, she uses recycled objects or memories to showcase the power of personal possessions — believing that humans collect meaningful keepsakes in search of their own paradise. Her work has become renowned in the past two decades for conveying inspiring messages of personal expression, energy, history and identity. Now, Smith’s globally acclaimed artwork comes to life with The Frame’s cutting-edge technology.
       
      Samsung Newsroom sat down with Smith to discuss her artistic journey and the inspiration behind some of her work.
       
      ▲ Shinique Smith poses in front of one of her works
       
       
      From Early Creative Exposure to a Varied and Flourishing Career
      Q: Tell us a bit about yourself and your career as an artist. How did your early exposure to the art world influence your career?
       
      I was born, raised and educated in Baltimore, Maryland. My mother made certain that creativity was integral to my upbringing. What began as arts and crafts in my early childhood inspired me to attend the Baltimore School for the Arts, where I completed my undergraduate and graduate studies in fine art and arts education.
       
      In addition to my more than 12 years of arts education, my mother’s creative and intellectual endeavors — including fashion design, science, world religions and spiritual practices — were all influential and have become the conceptual core of my artistic practice.
       
      Art has shaped my worldview since it is a lifelong study, pursuit and career.
       
       
      Q: You work with many different media, ranging from sculpture to painting. What is your favorite to work with?
       
      I consider sculpture and painting to be opposite sides of the same coin, and my favorite is when they influence each other. I create with many materials — paint, fabric, collage, photography and performance. I enjoy finding the connections and harmonies that resonate between them.
       
       
      Q: Tell us a bit about your artistic process. How do you get from start to finish on a project?
       
      Drawing is the foundation of my artistic process. I draw sketches of sculptures that I’ve already made or plan to make in the future. This keeps my mind and hands coordinated and fresh. Paintings begin with words translated into gestures on paper or canvas. From there, I build layers, edit and find connections of color and meaning in the elements that I add. The process is almost entirely intuitive.
       
       
      Q: Do you recall a pivotal moment or experience in your career that still influences your work?
       
      “Twilight’s Compendium,” a site-specific installation at the Denver Art Museum, is one of my most signficant works. I used my body to make prints on the wall and combined them with sculpture and collage to create my first large-scale installation. It was a catalog of blues and a collection of marks that I learned throughout the process — which I continue to use now.
       
       
      An Intimate Museum in Samsung’s Art Store
      Q: Your work has been displayed at institutions ranging from the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston to the New Museum in New York. How does displaying your work on The Frame compare to displaying it inside museums or galleries?
       
      Both platforms grant access to a wide audience. In museums, the viewer must take in the work in a more public, fast-paced environment. The Frame, on the other hand, is like having a piece of the museum in an intimate space, giving the viewer more time to explore details of the work.
       
       
      Q: You have a collection of public works in cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco and more. How do you feel public works like these compare to your work that is widely available to users of The Frame?
       
      My public works are available for people to see while in transit. They are monumentally scaled, from 60 to 150 feet. Some are indoors and at ground level, and others are outside and so high in the air that viewers must be at a distance to see the whole piece. All my works — wherever they are found — reveal intricate details upon closer observation, similar to viewing art on The Frame.
       
       
      Q: What pieces would you recommend users display on The Frame? Please give a brief explanation of each.
       
      ▲ “Angel” (2011)
       
      “Angel” is a composite of three images I shot of one of my favorite hanging sculptures. With pink and rainbows, this piece is great to display on The Frame since not everyone has space for work like this in their home.
       
      ▲ “Dusk” (2012)
       
      “Dusk” is a fabric wall sculpture and the only one that became a landscape made from clothing in my closet. I’m inspired by our quest for paradise and utopia through our keepsakes. For users, I hope it could be like viewing an imaginative rolling hill through a window.
       
      ▲ “Memories of my youth streak by on the 23” (2019)
       
      “Memories of my youth streak by on the 23” is new to The Frame, and it is my favorite part of a mural-like mixed media painting. Through the cut mirrors, the viewer catches glimpses of themselves in the work — like my experience riding the bus to school as a teenager or seeing my window reflection against the cityscape.
       
       
      Technology and Artistic Accessibility
      Q: Do you feel there are any advantages to displaying your work digitally, such as on The Frame?
       
      I love seeing my work in different scales and mediums. The Frame is a beautiful platform that gives the viewer the advantage of both variety and intimacy.
       
       
      Q: Throughout your career, how have you seen technology influence the art world? How do you see this changing in the future?
       
      Anything that causes a shift in society is reflected in the art world — technology has evolved so drastically that it has changed modern society with home computers, wireless cable TV, the internet and social media.
       
      Disposable cameras and camcorders gave people wider access to photography and videography. Now, everyone can film, document and share every increment of life through their smartphones.
       
      Looking to the future, everyone is talking about AI and using it to think and create for people. As we continue this exploration, I hope we will continue to rely on our own abilities and creativity.
       
       
      Q: Do you have any upcoming projects you’re able to tell us about?
       
      “Metamorph” will open in April at the Monique Meloche Gallery during EXPO Chicago. The exhibition will showcase new paintings, sculptures and works on paper inspired by butterflies, transformation and resilient beauty.
       
      This July, I will also present a new large-scale sculptural installation at the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields.
       
      My latest exhibition, “Parade,” recently opened at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. The synergy between my contemporary fabric works and the adorned, draped figures of European master paintings is striking. Available until January 2025, the gallery will feature various talks and performances starting this May through the fall.
       
       
      Visit Samsung Art Store in The Frame to see more of Shinique Smith’s artwork.
      View the full article
    • By Samsung Newsroom
      Shinique Smith is a New York-based artist widely recognized for her monumental fabric sculptures and abstract paintings infused with calligraphy and collages. In her art, she uses recycled objects or memories to showcase the power of personal possessions — believing that humans collect meaningful keepsakes in search of their own paradise. Her work has become renowned in the past two decades for conveying inspiring messages of personal expression, energy, history and identity. Now, Smith’s globally acclaimed artwork comes to life with The Frame’s cutting-edge technology.
       
      Samsung Newsroom sat down with Smith to discuss her artistic journey and the inspiration behind some of her work.
       
      ▲ Shinique Smith poses in front of one of her works
       
       
      From Early Creative Exposure to a Varied and Flourishing Career
      Q: Tell us a bit about yourself and your career as an artist. How did your early exposure to the art world influence your career?
       
      I was born, raised and educated in Baltimore, Maryland. My mother made certain that creativity was integral to my upbringing. What began as arts and crafts in my early childhood inspired me to attend the Baltimore School for the Arts, where I completed my undergraduate and graduate studies in fine art and arts education.
       
      In addition to my more than 12 years of arts education, my mother’s creative and intellectual endeavors — including fashion design, science, world religions and spiritual practices — were all influential and have become the conceptual core of my artistic practice.
       
      Art has shaped my worldview since it is a lifelong study, pursuit and career.
       
       
      Q: You work with many different media, ranging from sculpture to painting. What is your favorite to work with?
       
      I consider sculpture and painting to be opposite sides of the same coin, and my favorite is when they influence each other. I create with many materials — paint, fabric, collage, photography and performance. I enjoy finding the connections and harmonies that resonate between them.
       
       
      Q: Tell us a bit about your artistic process. How do you get from start to finish on a project?
       
      Drawing is the foundation of my artistic process. I draw sketches of sculptures that I’ve already made or plan to make in the future. This keeps my mind and hands coordinated and fresh. Paintings begin with words translated into gestures on paper or canvas. From there, I build layers, edit and find connections of color and meaning in the elements that I add. The process is almost entirely intuitive.
       
       
      Q: Do you recall a pivotal moment or experience in your career that still influences your work?
       
      “Twilight’s Compendium,” a site-specific installation at the Denver Art Museum, is one of my most signficant works. I used my body to make prints on the wall and combined them with sculpture and collage to create my first large-scale installation. It was a catalog of blues and a collection of marks that I learned throughout the process — which I continue to use now.
       
       
      An Intimate Museum in Samsung’s Art Store
      Q: Your work has been displayed at institutions ranging from the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston to the New Museum in New York. How does displaying your work on The Frame compare to displaying it inside museums or galleries?
       
      Both platforms grant access to a wide audience. In museums, the viewer must take in the work in a more public, fast-paced environment. The Frame, on the other hand, is like having a piece of the museum in an intimate space, giving the viewer more time to explore details of the work.
       
       
      Q: You have a collection of public works in cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco and more. How do you feel public works like these compare to your work that is widely available to users of The Frame?
       
      My public works are available for people to see while in transit. They are monumentally scaled, from 60 to 150 feet. Some are indoors and at ground level, and others are outside and so high in the air that viewers must be at a distance to see the whole piece. All my works — wherever they are found — reveal intricate details upon closer observation, similar to viewing art on The Frame.
       
       
      Q: What pieces would you recommend users display on The Frame? Please give a brief explanation of each.
       
      ▲ “Angel” (2011)
       
      “Angel” is a composite of three images I shot of one of my favorite hanging sculptures. With pink and rainbows, this piece is great to display on The Frame since not everyone has space for work like this in their home.
       
      ▲ “Dusk” (2012)
       
      “Dusk” is a fabric wall sculpture and the only one that became a landscape made from clothing in my closet. I’m inspired by our quest for paradise and utopia through our keepsakes. For users, I hope it could be like viewing an imaginative rolling hill through a window.
       
      ▲ “Memories of my youth streak by on the 23” (2019)
       
      “Memories of my youth streak by on the 23” is new to The Frame, and it is my favorite part of a mural-like mixed media painting. Through the cut mirrors, the viewer catches glimpses of themselves in the work — like my experience riding the bus to school as a teenager or seeing my window reflection against the cityscape.
       
       
      Technology and Artistic Accessibility
      Q: Do you feel there are any advantages to displaying your work digitally, such as on The Frame?
       
      I love seeing my work in different scales and mediums. The Frame is a beautiful platform that gives the viewer the advantage of both variety and intimacy.
       
       
      Q: Throughout your career, how have you seen technology influence the art world? How do you see this changing in the future?
       
      Anything that causes a shift in society is reflected in the art world — technology has evolved so drastically that it has changed modern society with home computers, wireless cable TV, the internet and social media.
       
      Disposable cameras and camcorders gave people wider access to photography and videography. Now, everyone can film, document and share every increment of life through their smartphones.
       
      Looking to the future, everyone is talking about AI and using it to think and create for people. As we continue this exploration, I hope we will continue to rely on our own abilities and creativity.
       
       
      Q: Do you have any upcoming projects you’re able to tell us about?
       
      “Metamorph” will open in April at the Monique Meloche Gallery during EXPO Chicago. The exhibition will showcase new paintings, sculptures and works on paper inspired by butterflies, transformation and resilient beauty.
       
      This July, I will also present a new large-scale sculptural installation at the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields.
       
      My latest exhibition, “Parade,” recently opened at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. The synergy between my contemporary fabric works and the adorned, draped figures of European master paintings is striking. Available until January 2025, the gallery will feature various talks and performances starting this May through the fall.
       
       
      Visit Samsung Art Store in The Frame to see more of Shinique Smith’s artwork.
      View the full article
    • By Samsung Newsroom
      Steve McCurry from the international photography collective Magnum Photos, the photographer behind the iconic “Afghan Girl” portrait, has played a significant role in contemporary photography for more than four decades. Through his lens, McCurry has documented world conflicts, vanishing cultures, ancient traditions and modern society in an expressive, personal way. From the bustling streets of India to active warzones in Afghanistan, McCurry’s photographs have always been more than mere images — they are windows into the human experience.
       
      Magnum Photos
       
      Magnum Photos is a cooperative of world-famous press photographers. Located in New York, London, Paris and Tokyo, the collective provides photographs to media, publishers, advertisers, television, galleries and museums worldwide. Magnum’s photography library is a living archive of new works, updated daily from all over the world.
       
      His photography, which has traversed continents and cultures, is now available for The Frame, Samsung’s lifestyle TV. Through Samsung Art Store, his visual narratives find a place in homes around the world.
       
      Samsung Newsroom sat down with McCurry to talk about his inspiration and how technology can immortalize the stories told through his photography.
       
      ▲ Steve McCurry
       
       
      Finding Universality Through a Camera Lens
      Q: Do you have any significant moments or experiences that have influenced how you approach your work as a photographer?
       
      I have always had a desire to travel and push boundaries. After graduating from Pennsylvania State University and working at a newspaper for two years, I bought a one-way ticket to India with the money I had saved. I spent two years traveling throughout India and Nepal, photographing for a variety of magazines.
       
      In the spring of 1979, I stayed at a small hotel in Chitral, Pakistan — where I met some Afghan refugees from Nuristan who explained that many of the villages in their area had been destroyed. I told them I was a photographer, and they insisted that I come and capture the civil war. I had never photographed an area of conflict before and wasn’t sure how to react.
       
      After a few days, I walked with them over the mountains into Afghanistan and spent nearly three weeks photographing life there. I was astonished to see so many villages that had been virtually destroyed and abandoned. The roads were all blocked or under government control, so we had to walk everywhere. During this time, I met some people who I became close to.
       
      I was touched by the culture and beauty of the country. It was a different way of life with no modern conveniences, and I was drawn to the simplicity of that lifestyle. Everything was reduced to the basics — and that has made me return to Afghanistan time and time again.
       
       
      Q: You are well known for capturing raw emotions and intimate moments. How do you establish trust with your subjects, especially in culturally diverse settings?
       
      In my experience, most people are approachable. I find that once you explain what you are doing and how you can bring them into your process, people will open up and let you take their pictures.
       
      My photographs are how I observe the world and my surroundings. For me, the goal is to find some sort of universality among people across a huge variety of conditions. If I am successful, my artwork should be universally understood by anyone who has experienced the human condition, regardless of their circumstances.
       
       
      Q: Among your photographs, do you have a favorite?
       
      I took one of my favorite pictures when I was in an old part of Rajasthan, India. The whole city is painted in a wonderful blue color. I came across a corner and discovered children had left handprints on the wall during a festival. I thought, “What a great picture it would be if I could get people walking in or out of the frame.” After standing for about two hours, one little boy dashed through, and I caught him mid-stride. I was — and still am — happy with the picture.
       
      ▲ “Boy Playing,” Jodhpur, India (2007)
       
       
      From Lens to Living Room
      Q: How have users reacted to your work on The Frame this year?
       
      The response has been excellent. Users are excited to have such a wide range of artwork available on The Frame to keep their home interiors fresh.
       
      The Frame allows users to discover and appreciate new artists and artwork. It is amusing to see my work alongside classic masterpieces by Van Gogh and da Vinci, as well as many other up-and-coming artists.
       
       
      Q: Does displaying your art on The Frame differ from displaying your art in museums and galleries?
       
      The Frame allows users to transform their television into a dynamic art display. They can exhibit images in their home that they may not be able to see in person at museums. Although nothing beats seeing artwork in person, The Frame is a great way to experience art from the comfort of your own home.
       
       
      Q: What pieces would you recommend users display on The Frame? Please give us a brief explanation of each.
       
      For centuries in Tibet, prayer flags embellished with sacred writings have been hung with the belief that goodwill and compassion will be spread to all living beings as the wind passes over them.
       
      ▲ “Prayer Flags,” Tibet (2005)
       
      I spent two weeks with flower vendors as they plied their wares along the shores of Dal Lake in Kashmir, India. The act of buying and gifting flowers is deeply embedded in the region’s traditions and integral to the aesthetic and economy. Their shikaris,1 filled with blooms, offered a deep sense of tranquility and provided a welcome contrast to the hustle and bustle of the surrounding town.
       
      ▲ “Dal Lake,” Srinagar, Kashmir (1999)
       
      ▲ “Boat in India,” Srinagar, Kashmir (1999)
       
       
      Photography in the Digital Age
      Q: Could you describe if and how technology has changed how you work over the years?
       
      I worked exclusively with film for most of my career, but I have fully embraced digital technology these days. While it hasn’t changed the way I see my work or the way I photograph, technology has undoubtedly altered the process — allowing me to work in much lower light and more complex situations than I could in the past. Nonetheless, the same truths apply to any image regardless of the technique that went into crafting it. There’s impermanence about all things and nostalgia about things in the past — but I prefer to look to the future.
       
       
      Q: How does the digital format of The Frame compare to other platforms where you have shared your work, such as galleries, museums or even magazine covers?
       
      Each medium has its advantages. Digital art is virtually permanent, and exposure to heat and light doesn’t affect color — but the medium can be a matter of personal preference. Many museums are supplementing their exhibitions with multi-media presentations, merging different formats. It will be interesting to see what the future holds since technology is evolving every day.
       
      The Frame is a wonderful way to see pictures in a more intimate home setting. I remember getting off a plane and seeing one of my pictures on a huge screen at JFK Airport in New York. It was surreal to see my work enjoyed by thousands of people passing through the terminal. Similarly, The Frame allows people to view art more comfortably — adding a new dimension to the experience.
       
       
      Q: In this digital age where most people use their phones as cameras, how do you see the role of professional photographers evolving?
       
      The medium, platform or technology — whether it’s Instagram, digital or film — is not important. Successful photography has to be about telling stories and being creative, having your own interpretation and voice to say what is important to you and conveying those emotions through your photographs.
       
       
      Q: What is next for you in the coming year?
       
      I will soon be traveling to Antarctica and working on a new book of short stories.
       
      Visit the Samsung Art Store in The Frame to see more of Steve McCurry’s work.
       
       
      1 (In Kashmir) A light, flat-bottomed houseboat.
      View the full article
    • By Samsung Newsroom
      Samsung Electronics America announced it has brought Samsung display technologies to the highly anticipated FORMULA 1 HEINEKEN SILVER LAS VEGAS GRAND PRIX 2023 through its partnership with Liberty Media and Las Vegas Grand Prix, Inc. With lights out on November 18, spectators attending the race in Las Vegas or watching from around the world will see Samsung display technologies shine bright throughout the Las Vegas Grand Prix pit building, including 3 extra-large grandstand screens with a total of 3.8 million pixels, a dynamic tight-pitch display that serves as a backdrop for the entry escalator as well as a new “star” in the sky an LED display in the form of the F1 logo — the dazzling LED display that sits atop the 1,000-foot-long pit building rooftop that’s so bright, it may even be visible from outer space.
       

       
      “As F1’s viewership skyrockets in the U.S., Liberty Media and the Las Vegas Grand Prix are focused on delivering the most memorable experiences for fans in attendance as well as viewing the broadcast around the world,” said James Fishler, Senior Vice President of the Display and Home Entertainment Divisions, Samsung Electronics America. “The 2023 Las Vegas Grand Prix is a turning point for the sport of racing, as the installation of these best-in-class Samsung displays dramatically adorns the Las Vegas Grand Prix pit building and revolutionizes how fans in the grandstands watch this race.”
       
       
      F1 Rooftop Logo
      The 28,166-square-foot 10mm LED display with over 22 million pixels spans 481 feet — longer than a football field — and mirrors the shape of the F1 logo, exciting viewers watching from home as broadcasters use the sign to provide more immersive and close-up views of the race.
       

       
       
      Escalator Trapezoid
      The 1,480-square-foot 3.9mm LED escalator display is designed to create a “wow” moment as it presents stunning content using over 9 million pixels.
       
       
      Grandstand
      The grandstands are outfitted with three 941-square-foot Samsung 8mm LED displays with over 1.2 million pixels to enhance the viewing experience for all in-person attendees, ensuring that a moment of the action is not missed. The new displays feature Samsung’s latest and most advanced HDR10+ technology, with over 8,000-nit brightness, to provide the most dynamic image quality even on the sunniest of days.
       
      The F1 Rooftop Logo, Escalator Trapezoid and three Grandstand displays feature over 33 million Samsung LED pixels and over 32,000 square feet and together, are long enough to lap the Las Vegas Strip Circuit two and a half times.
       

       
      “Las Vegas is primed to host an F1 Grand Prix event of the most impressive magnitude, and we are excited to deliver heightened experiences for our fans,” said Renee Wilm, Chief Executive Officer of Las Vegas Grand Prix, Inc. “Through our partnership, we are achieving this goal with the innovative technology that Samsung has brought to the Las Vegas Strip Circuit.”
       
      Samsung’s partnership with Liberty Media and Las Vegas Grand Prix, Inc. is just one of the many ways the company is revolutionizing the fan experience across professional sports leagues. In addition to the displays featured onsite at the Formula 1 Las Vegas Grand Prix, Samsung powers state-of-the-art LED technology at notable venues from across the nation, including Hollywood Park, Citi Field and Minute Maid Park. Samsung also brings the excitement of the stadium and racetrack into the living room with its line-up of Samsung Neo QLED 8K and 4K class TVs featuring lifelike picture and sound. For Formula 1 fans looking to get behind the wheel, the Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 curved monitor delivers an immersive racing game experience with seamless, hyper-fast action and unrivaled UHD color and depth.
       
      To learn more about Samsung’s Live Events and Sports Signage solutions, please visit: https://www.samsung.com/us/business/solutions/industries/live-events-sports/displays/.
      View the full article





×
×
  • Create New...