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Samsung and Intersoft Eurasia introduced personal radiation monitoring device based on Tizen


Alex

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At the World Nuclear Exhibition 2016 (WNE 2016) that takes place in a Parisian suburb Le Bourget from June, 28 to June, 30 Samsung Electronics and Intersoft Eurasia OJSC – a Skolkovo Technopark resident – showcased the core for personal radiation monitoring device DO-RA. Core based on the proprietary technologies. This innovative device measures background radiation level of the environment and by synchronizing with a smartphone shows this information on a display using a specialized mobile app. The new product was made on the basis of Tizen secure mobile platform with the application of personal environment and food radiation monitoring technology.

DO-RA is an affordable and compact dosimeter-radiometer, equipped with solid silicon detector DoRaSi, reading electronics and energy-efficient components. In its standard configuration the device measures MED of ionizing radiation and provides broadcast data transmission over Bluetooth Low Energy profile (BLE). The first version of DO-RA allows to exchange data between smartphones based on OS Tizen over a sound channel with data integrity and adequacy check. In perspective it is planned to increase measuring capabilities of the DO-RA.Core base version by adding specific sensors and expanding data communication channel to Bluetooth 2.0 by means of hybrid Bluetooth.

The showcased DO-RA device functions on the basis of Tizen mobile platform and Samsung Z3 smartphone. The mobile platform enables effective use of a hi tech pack – DO-RA measuring device and a smartphone for solving any  monitoring and analytical issues.

“Recently we presented a corporate version of Samsung Z3 smartphone based on Tizen, which was a very important step for us in the OS extension in Russia. Today we are happy to start the new phase of our work and demonstrate DO-RA technology as yet another innovative solution made in cooperation with a Russian company. I am sure, that the new device is going to become common use in our country and will provide Russian consumers with additional benefits,” –commented Alexander Terekhov, Head of B2B Mobile at Samsung Electronics in Russia.

The World Nuclear Exhibition is being held since 2014 and is one of the most significant events in the area of nuclear solutions and innovations harnessed for peaceful uses. The main theme of WNE 2016 is The role of nuclear industry in the global energy mix. As expected more that 10 000 people from 71 countries will visit the exhibition of nearly 700 innovative solutions. The event is organized by the Association of French Nuclear Export Industries (AIFEN).

“The Intersoft Eurasia’s project is a vivid example of Skolkovo Foundation commitment to supporting commercialization of radiotechnology solutions and solutions in B2C segment,” – said Igor Karavaev, Vice-president and CEO of Cluster Nuclear Technologies at Skolkovo Foundation.

About DO-RA project:

The primary idea of DO-RA project dates from June, 2011 and is protected by Russian licence №109625. It also has licenses of foreign jurisdiction: USA, Japan, China, Korea, India, EU, Belorussia, Ukraine.

In 2013 Dow Jones estimated the plow-back of Intersoft Eurasia OJSC – the DO-RA project provider – as $10 mln. Thereafter within its innovative activities the company received 55 patents in various fields of IT industry.

The name DO-RA was created from the first letter combinations of the words dozimeter-radiometer – DO-RA. The abbreviations coincide both in Russian and English languages which increases awareness of the device.  

The DO-RA project’s website: www.do-ra.ru , www.intersofteurasia.ru

About Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. inspires the world and shapes the future with transformative ideas and technologies, opening new possibilities for people everywhere through relentless innovation and discovery. For the latest news, please visit the Samsung Newsroom at news.samsung.com.

 
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      Technology and Artistic Accessibility
      Q: Do you feel there are any advantages to displaying your work digitally, such as on The Frame?
       
      I love seeing my work in different scales and mediums. The Frame is a beautiful platform that gives the viewer the advantage of both variety and intimacy.
       
       
      Q: Throughout your career, how have you seen technology influence the art world? How do you see this changing in the future?
       
      Anything that causes a shift in society is reflected in the art world — technology has evolved so drastically that it has changed modern society with home computers, wireless cable TV, the internet and social media.
       
      Disposable cameras and camcorders gave people wider access to photography and videography. Now, everyone can film, document and share every increment of life through their smartphones.
       
      Looking to the future, everyone is talking about AI and using it to think and create for people. As we continue this exploration, I hope we will continue to rely on our own abilities and creativity.
       
       
      Q: Do you have any upcoming projects you’re able to tell us about?
       
      “Metamorph” will open in April at the Monique Meloche Gallery during EXPO Chicago. The exhibition will showcase new paintings, sculptures and works on paper inspired by butterflies, transformation and resilient beauty.
       
      This July, I will also present a new large-scale sculptural installation at the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields.
       
      My latest exhibition, “Parade,” recently opened at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. The synergy between my contemporary fabric works and the adorned, draped figures of European master paintings is striking. Available until January 2025, the gallery will feature various talks and performances starting this May through the fall.
       
       
      Visit Samsung Art Store in The Frame to see more of Shinique Smith’s artwork.
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