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Can I publish my stream from a Tizen web application?

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I am developing an alarm management application on a wearable device. It is a Web application (HTML and Javascript). When the alarm is triggered, in addition to sending the alarm status to the control panel, it should record the sound all around the device. This recording should arrive, in real time, in the operations center, publishing the audio stream on the reference Wowza server.

Thanks in advance!

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